Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

cubaencuentro: Obama irá a Cuba… Ya yo fui

May 22, 2016

http://www.cubaencuentro.com/opinion/articulos/obama-ira-a-cuba-ya-yo-fui-324938

Obama irá a Cuba… Ya yo fui
¿Qué pasará cuando regrese Obama a Washington y la autoridad isleña se sienta sin compromisos?
Miguel Cabrera Peña, Santiago de Chile | 29/02/2016 11:41 am
<hr />
Miguel, bro:

soy cubano como tú, la gran mayoría de los que nos metemos aquí, los que decidan o no ir, cuán frecuente o por las razones que lo hagan. En mi caso particular, por decirlo así, hace más de 20 años (que definitivamente son algo) que estoy ausente al recuento en el combinado.

No entiendo cual es tu tanta molestia por “la humillación del ser humano” esa de que hablas, los problemas de “Barack Obama y del mundo democrático” …

La policía en Cuba actúa a la cara. Eso no es nada nuevo y vivir en el yuma (que según supongo pertenezca a ese “mundo democrático” del cual hablas) me ha hecho ver muy claramente que lo prefiero así a como actúa la policía en el yuma.

Como, según dices, trabajas para Radio Martí (se me había hasta olvidado) puede que “no me entiendas” o que el “trabajar” para ellos te halla “educado” tu entendimiento y poder de razionalización:
~
// __ Targeted Individuals: what the US .01% MUST do to avoid arrests for obvious crimes centering in war, money, lies

Targeted Individuals: what the US .01% MUST do to avoid arrests for obvious crimes centering in war, money, lies

https://ipsoscustodes.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/zersetzung-made-in-u-s-a/

https://ipsoscustodes.wordpress.com/2010/10/16/quis-custodiet-ipsos-custodes/
~
Aunque vivamos en la libertad hay algo que no dejamos los cubanos jamás: el ser orilleros.

Hace algún tiempo atrás (antes de Snowden) hablaba sobre los CDR en la “libertad”:

http://www.penultimosdias.com/2012/08/30/padres-e-hijos/

Como listo periodista y conocedor de la represión “isleña” que dices ser me pregunto como es que no notas el filón periodístico que tuviera semejante antropología comparativa. Pero, bueno, puede que eso no sea “democrático” o “responsable” como suelen decir en el NY Times.

Te digo, quiero que lleguen la “democracia” y la “libertad” a Cuba yá, pero me pregunto que alucinantes carajos le importa a Obama ni a ningún politico yuma esa “democracia” y “libertad” de que hablas en Cuba ni en ningún otro lugar …

Los yumas ni siquiera saben donde está Cuba “with both their hands on their @ss”

RCL

FBI’S “SHARED RESPONSIBILITY COMMITTEES” TO IDENTIFY “RADICALIZED” MUSLIMS RAISE ALARMS

April 9, 2016

https://theintercept.com/2016/04/09/fbis-shared-responsibility-committees-to-identify-radicalized-muslims-raises-alarms/?comments=1#comments

<blockquote>
The FBI’s plan to enlist community leaders in “Shared Responsibility Committees” all across the country with the goal of identifying “radicalized” individuals is raising alarm among civil rights activists.
</blockquote>

“Shared Responsibility Committees” …

“SRC”. They just missed one letter and one permutation while comparing it with “CDR”.

They keep out-1984ing -1984 itself. Castro communism and Chávez socialists call them CDR, Nazi’s institutionalized Jewish Ghetto Police (not “Jüdische gemeinsame Verantwortung Ausschüsse”)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Ghetto_Police

and Jewish people asked even Nazis for clemency from their brutality, but of course when we do it it is called “Shared Responsibility Committees” only freedom hating lowlifes would do such things as socially persecuting other people.

All building superintendents in NYC are forced by their landlords to double as snitches for the the NYPD (I doubt they get any money for “working” for them) and they have instituted something called “nexus” in NYC. Basically all business owners from University Departments to barbershops (including filthy bodegas) must include snitching cells for the NYPD/FBI.

<blockquote>
The FBI’s ideas is to have social service workers, teachers, mental health professionals, religious figures, and others interdict young people they believe are on a path towards radicalization.
</blockquote>

… and we will not only pay you to do “believe” young people are “‘on a path’ towards radicalization”, but we will leave to your own creative fancy the interpretation of what that “being ‘on a path’ towards radicalization” could possibly mean.

Sorry, since we are “responsible” we can’t share with you our own interpretations of “”‘on a path’ towards …” thing

<blockquote>
Experts acknowledge the need to have options beyond sending young people to jail for making threatening statements.
</blockquote>

Wouldn’t those self-considered “experts” acknowledge the need to do something about USG greatly surpassing the genocidal ratio of Nazi Germany during WWII?

Oh, wait! How is it they say? “if you see something, say something” so the problem may be those “experts” don’t see any of that.

<blockquote>
Arun Kundnani, an adjunct professor at New York University and expert on U.K. counterterrorism policy, said he worries that the U.S. program would “suffer from the same problems, such as drawing non-policing professionals into becoming the eyes and ears of counter-terrorism surveillance, and thereby undermining professional norms and relationships of trust among educators, health workers and others.”
</blockquote>

There goes U.S. Academia

Here you have NYU graduate Imam Khalid Latif

// __ Faith Under Fire: A Response from Imam Khalid Latif

youtube.com/watch?v=GdqbyUQPzzs
~
even though I do see he is trying to soften animosity against Muslim people and from his position he could do that very well, I can’t understand at all how he could work for the police.

That to me is way more than enough to not even be able to listen to him in a physical sense regardless of whatever he says, how poetic he tries to sound and how “funny” he tries to be as part of his persuasive appeal.

Do you have to become a pig to defend justice? Probably he just finds cool dressing a NYPD uniform and wearing a taqiyah.

As he relates, he has found himself in really odd situations. He makes fun of the FBI and points out to them their hypocrisy, but he doesn’t see his own. Do you have to become a pig to defend justice, stand against abuse?

<blockquote>
But this is completely contrary to both the experience of the U.K., where about 80 percent of Channel referrals are rejected as unfounded.
</blockquote>

It is exactly that 20% they find very profitably substantial. They say one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, right?

<blockquote>
there are no predictors or indicators of who is going to become a terrorist
</blockquote>

but they need “terrorists” (other than themselves) how on earth will they justify their salaries? I haven’t still gotten an explanation from USG as to why the have included me in the FBI criminal index.

USG: “Sorry, we can’t share with you our predictors or indicators, because if we do, then it will be all too clear we got them from the “personality profiles” from Nazi era and stasi psychopathic psychologists.

In fact there is no rocket science as to how USG has been using those “predictors” and “indicators”: the NSA stratifies the patterns of behavior of every one of us (super basic Math + data analysis + More Law’s when it comes to hardware) and if you show just a shred of “unnorm” or just “peculiar” individuality (for example, I don’t own a cell phone or TV set, nor am I on facebook …) they first start messing with you (breaking your car’s windows, switching lights on and moving things around in your apartment …), afterwards they make one of their snitches whom you are acquainted with come up to you or someone (dressed in expensive shoes …) stand on a street corner or place you regularly frequent and suggest to you to “share responsibility”; then, if you refuse to become a snitch then you become a “targeted individual” for the rest of your life, which includes character assassination and -physical- torture to you and your family members:

Targeted Individuals: testimony of current government covert torture & control experiments

Targeted Individuals: what the US .01% MUST do to avoid arrests for obvious crimes centering in war, money, lies

<blockquote>
Law enforcement agencies faced with a mandate of preventive policing of terrorism cases say that they are often compelled to err on the side of making arrests
</blockquote>

There wouldn’t be anything wrong with “erring on the side of making arrests” if they would apply it in a just way. What about implicating as terrorists those patriots killing at times hundreds of people without even knowing who they are (you just fit their pattern recognition metrics), just because they can?

Oh, no wait! Of course, those rules don’t apply to them because they are our glorious, patriotic freedom lovers! Also, they are not killing them they are just using high tech to degrade their biological live to a baseline physical one. Besides the people they kill are not even human beings to begin with. Are they describe by Western media as such?

<blockquote>
There are a lot of attacks on heavy handed counterterrorism approaches, like informants and agent provocateurs, but that’s the status quo now until we have other options.”
</blockquote>

… “until we have ‘other options'”?

<blockquote>
But, Hughes said, the responsibilities of the interveners would need to be well defined
</blockquote>

I keep suggesting to USG to come out of the closet. If you actually believe in something you should do it in the open and transparently.

Castro’s CDRs sport a big sign “in very street block” (“en cada cuadra un comité”).

If they have survived both an inhuman embargo (actually costing human lives) and such things as “freedom-lovingly” blowing up in mid flight a plane packed with teenagers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cubana_de_Aviaci%C3%B3n_Flight_455

and the end of their life line: the fall of the soviet union, sporting a life expectancy higher than the U.S. and even Denmark, sure can gringos survive “terrorism” just fine

<blockquote>
if SRCs are going to succeed. For instance, there are concerns that the social worker or mental health professional who fails to tell the FBI someone poses a threat before they go out and commit an attack might be held civilly liable by families of the victims.
</blockquote>

this is past sarcasm, really callous joke!

<blockquote>
“But the FBI is not listening to the community advocates, they’re listening to the people receiving grants, who are paid to put programs like this into place.”
</blockquote>

How strange, right?

truth and peace and love,
RCL

Cuba …

January 31, 2016

Once I was talking to a Spanish friend (from Spain) who was talking in ways that showed she liked “‘her’ country” in a especial way (even using the possessive “my” referring to “country” doesn’t sound quite right to me). It occurred to me that I don’t think or feel “my country” in quite the same way, even though I don’t hate my people at all or dislike Cuba (the island in the Caribbean). In fact, I like my people for very particular reasons. I thought (and to a certain extent still think) that “love for your homeland” is another of the illusions fostered by politicians and such wholesale b#llsh!tt3rs for their own schemes. To me “loving your homeland” is like the childish playground stunt: “my mama is better than yours”.

Still, most people make a big deal about “your/their backgrounds” when in fact it is, like many other aspects relating to “social contracts” such as your ethnic group, religion …; contrived by factors you have no way of influencing whatsoever. You are whatever you are because of the reality you were given birth into by your mother, family; the cultural customs of the ethnic groups they belonged to …

OK, that doesn’t totally determine who you are, your own believes in an “A-implies-B” way, but it does frame your ways to see reality. I was married to a great woman who would repeat to me: “you ‘see’ what you -know-” I don’t totally agree with it and I have clearly seen this is only partially true. She was right. At some point we started to have conjugal problems and she recommended we both seek counseling on our own and as a couple. And, who am I to date to disagree with my wife!?! ;-), so I did go to see my “loquera” twice (even though to me it was total b#llsh!t). In our first visit, she asked me: “what brings you here?”. I explained to her that after having a (loving, yet) very tough mother, now I am dealing with a tough wife … She went like: ” …, but what is the problem? Most boys marry their mothers and they don’t even notice it … because, this is what they know”. When I told my wife about it she told me: ” …, but you are not supposed to take at face value what they tell you” ;-)

I grew up in the Cuba of the 60’s during the initial years of the Revolution, as part of a family of high-profile political dissidents, anarchists and musicians. When I was a little boy I thought being an “undesirable minority” was some sort of fastidious curse, chronic disease. Children do notice sh!t that doesn’t seem to be right, but you can’t understand why or exactly how so. Now I find it super cool and profitable since it put my consciousness on another level and made me wonder about the human condition from an unfavorably true perspective.

Some people say it is just fear. I know it isn’t, it is way more complicated than that. Yet, in a sense, I did despise my people for not fighting Castro. Something interesting that I find about my people is that they have endured 6 decades of dictatorship and still are “Cubans”. A generally good people known for their love for music and dancing.

// __ El Lado Oscuro de CUBA

youtube.com/watch?v=hW51iYrGcb8 (1/2)

youtube.com/watch?v=pMUdwT5QF44 (2/2)

https://newrepublic.com/article/125539/cuba-can-teach-us-food-climate-change

When people talk about “Cubans” some people talk about us as a doomed people, some other as healthy and educated, as being unproportionally good in sports, sciences (Cubans are only 2% of Latin Americans and make for 11% of their scientists, Cuba has more doctors per capita than any other country …), but those would know us really would say that what really sets us apart is our sense of humor, our “bitchiness”.

Western people would not understand that I would not even know how to translate it. It is like the elaborate sense of sarcasm people have in NYC. It is called “choteo”, “cuero”, “jodedera”; a viscerally merciless way to poking people with jokes about their own believes, family … There was that Cuban comedian who said that “funerals turn out so badly because people don’t rehearse them” ;-). I remember people cracking jokes to the police while they were being handcuffed and even the Castros cracking jokes themselves and being angry about those “counterrevolutionary” jokes (right after their remarks jokes were running in Havana)

I think it was Chaplin who said that comedians are above politicians. Neurobiologists say the a good sense of humor is proof of a healthy brain/mind. Moreover, I can’t understand why the NSA spy on other people and goes about their Kremlinology, when just paying attention to people’s jokes is more than enough. Gringos seem to have a hard time with jokes:

~

// __ Jennifer Aniston Adopts 33-Year-Old Boyfriend From Africa

youtube.com/watch?v=bSqFQjCq3m8

// __ Is Our Wealth Hurting Africa’s Feelings?

youtube.com/watch?v=gyGHHxUFY6w

// __ Bloomberg Defends NYPD’s Controversial Stop And Kiss Program

youtube.com/watch?v=GXXaj–a6-4

// __ Gap Unveils New ‘For Kids By Kids’ Clothing Line

youtube.com/watch?v=OXb3dzNLebk

// __ Queen Will Leave Behind Long Legacy Of Waving

youtube.com/watch?v=n5pkDB7zEeo

// __ China’s Andy Rooney Has Funny Opinions On How Great China Is

youtube.com/watch?v=6SBxuHTlw98

~

They don’t seem to understand cracking jokes about themselves. They would find it “disrespectful”, “offensive”. They don’t even see the point of cracking jokes.

My people are exceptionally good a cracking jokes about themselves. Something peculiarly funny about Cuban people is that they name a cold virus “La Traviata” (Verdi’s) and argue about the importance of the Barroque in Latin America (as a way to criticize the government’s agenda)

~

// __ corto cubano, Utopía

youtube.com/watch?v=yQ7WXViVMmk

// __ Nicanor O’Donnell (4) Homo Sapiens – 2006

youtube.com/watch?v=_6wuRVN0JR8

// __ Nicanor O’Donnell (6) Brainstorm – 2009

youtube.com/watch?v=kSCTPz3gFas

// __ Película ” Alicia en el pueblo de maravillas ”

youtube.com/watch?v=uB1vizQbPKQ

// __ José Martí: El ojo del canario

youtube.com/watch?v=ff8amV9VWCo

~

RCL


http://alijebrock.blogspot.com/2010/04/la-patria.html

http://alijebrock.blogspot.com/2010/06/cuban-complexities.html

It turns out that was my neighborhood when I was a child I have been dreaming about lately so I tried to find pictures and here I am …

La Comunidad Hebrea is on I % 13 y 15. Why didn’t you show pictures of the whole building? They also own the large theater next to the synagogue.
I used to live on the other side of the same block J % 13 y 15. But we had ways to get there climbing walls. We kids used to fight for those areas ;-)

You don’t mention a pizza parlor Montecatini on J y 15. Does it still exist?

When I was a kid, aspie me knew and kept a mental map of everything, everybody, their dogs, … within a mile (all the way to el Malecón (I still miss the smell of the sea around Havana)). I kind of still wonder what happened to all those people and places?

Your impressions felt a bit like Karen Muller’s excellent documentary.

Now your impressions somehow got into my nostalgic dreams ;-)

Some of my best friends: Franklin, his brother Javier were Jewish (heck! What was the name of Franklin’s nice and true girlfriend? I have her name right now on the tip of my tongue (Eva?)). I did notice they were a bit different even though I didn’t quite understand how or why

Also, I did notice you have started to like Cuba too much ;-) it is true that people in Cuba love José Martí to an unhealthy degree, but Cuba is a “socialist” country ;-)

Thank you,
RCL

Demnach wird entschieden: …

October 19, 2015

1) Die Einreise in die Schweiz wird nich bewilligt

2) Das Asylgesuch aus dem Ausland wird abgelehnt

Response to Scheiz: 17923869 (abgelehnt 25, September 2015)

Iceweasel/Firefox browser JS console: The Intercept …

June 25, 2014

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Bim Adewunmi: The everyday microaggressions I experience as a black woman in Berlin

December 8, 2013

~
Reichstag building, Berlin
~
RE: Bim Adewunmi: The Guardian, Sunday 8 December 2013 15.00 EST
~
Bim Adewunmi in Berlin: theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/dec/08/black-woman-in-berlin”
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OK, here goes the opinion of another English (, Spanish and German) speaking person, also with Yoruba ancestry (I was born black (more like multi-racial) in Cuba), who doesn’t exactly sport an Afro (more like kinky hair) and, mostly out of laziness, regulary shaves his head
~
I was last in Berlin (a city I would admit I have always liked even though I don’t like a bit die mittleeuropaische Zeit) a few years ago and I felt a bit like “where is everybody?” ;-) (people have told me I would feel the same if I visit Minnesota U.S.A.)
~
To a large extent it may relate to the fact that when I went to Germany it was as a student and I was “young” and impressionable, but I did learn the good in them, to the point of considering myself (by exposure) a bit “German”, even though German people/culture themselves could not even begin to understand why I found this and that “impressive” to begin with, for example German “Sachlichkeit” I love (maybe aspie me is conditioned to thoroughly love it) or maybe I just don’t see race or sex as political issues in general to begin with, but at some point I saw past what you call their “everyday microaggressions”
~
I remember right before I left my country that my father told me with a concerned face “not to get upset if someone called me black” and I wondered why would I get upset … “I am black after all” (it felt kind of getting upset for people calling me by my name and people in Cuba call each other “black” in a friendly, neutral way as if they were calling each other “dude” (in the U.S.)), but then I understood what he meant …
~
> I thought about something that comedian Dave Chappelle performed back in 2000, in which he says some encounters leave you feeling like you’re watching a scene from a movie.
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Those kinds of “experiences” accompany all kinds of learning processes. Part of it is that German people (for example as they compare to gringos) are very disinhibited when it comes to their opinions even though they may not exactly be solicited.
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You would not hear the end of it if I start telling stories about my experiences regarding “micro”, all-out, tacit, subtle, … aggressions. For example in my early tweinties days after I had gotten there while taking a shower I very anxiously noticed two girls that mindlessly came with their gossip and totally naked into the boys’ showers. I would not consider that exactly an agression, but I nervously and without knowing what to make of it walked out of there and, they noticing I was black, stopped their gossip to mercilessly eye me … then a friend of mine explained to me those girls simply heard the hot water running in the boys showers and didn’t feel like waiting for the cold water to run through the pipes during that super cold winter … and that they would not understand at all if I would try to make anything out of that chance encounter … As Catholic Polish people living in their common borders so well know German people like to free themselves of their clothes whenever they can probably thinking that just air exposure will tan them …
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> The staring never really feels malicious, just curious and rude.
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I can’t get how you can see anything rude in some kid’s reaction. Some old ladies once did a bet my (very dark hair) was a wig and pulled it exactly as you describe but in my case they kept talking to themselves unperturbed about the bet … In some other ocassion I took a long trip to listen to a children choir (I grew up in a family of musicians), but when I arrived they almost refused to sell me a ticket and keep explanining to me how I could take the bus back to Dresden ;-)
~
I did learn German pretty fast to the point of writing poetry in that language
~
https://hsymbolicus.wordpress.com/category/gedichter/
~
before I did in my mother tongue (I found the language (and then languages in general) fascinating) and I have never protected myself from exposure and in addition to that I tend to be a natural Einzelgaenger, so I could understand from where they were coming from and let me just tell you that being loudly yelled out those pesky “BlutSchande” in a bus while I was there with my girlfriend by a group of youth was (the least to say) not nice. Even my “white” Cuban friends (some of them German descendants) were outraged when they experienced those personal (micro?) aggressions to themselves and other people, but I found them mostly stupid when they were (only and verbally) towards me and I could still see when the point was joking around, like that time while in a bar when I did notice two guys who came from behind some girlfriends and I did (physically) fight them. Police took all of us out and even though I was the one whom they had seen giving a blow to one of the guys (who kept joking about “me having two girls and them having none”) after it all was clarified (“Die haben meinen Arsch angefasst” ;-)) and even though they dind’t like exactly like “Scheisswauslaenders” they expelled the two guys from that nightclub
~
> In Alexanderplatz, almost a month to the day, another stranger plunged his hand into my afro and laughed. That night as I braided my hair out of reach of strangers’ hands, I double-checked the dates of my flight home. I can’t wait to be anonymous again.
~
After those experiences you won’t be ever able to be “anonymous” again even if you “go back”. I did spend in Germany 4+ very intensive years in that explains to a large extent why our experiences towards pretty much the same issues are so different, but I wonder if you had a chance to visit the Deutsche Museum where you could have seen how they will teach you about their own history (specially those dark Nazi past times, which is what we really want to learn about) next time (if you can and want) you should pay yourself a ticket to the U.S. and try to find anything resembling that level of honesty about their own history. I would suggest going to the National Museum of the American Indian in DC (they have many museums in the same area)
~
Im Detschem Museum you will see horrible torture, killing machines with extensive technical and historical explanations about those most despictable acts against humanity. When you ask gringos why aren’t their museums like that they ask you (I am not kidding you) “What do you mean?”, then they (those who know “what I mean”) tell you “… but doing this would be like accepting that that was right”, or the greatest of them all so far … “if you go to the museum of the U.S. military you will find out about how U.S. soldiers suffered the consecuences of using chemical weapons against the Vietnamese” … Now you don’t have to know so well about the proof of Goedel’s incompleteness theorems to be able to see the huge bug in that kind of thinking
~
Leviathan212: 08 December 2013 8:32pm
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Leviathan212: the monarchy and the church made Britain a more tolerant place
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> … But, I do think both the monarchy and the church have played a role in making Britain a more tolerant place.
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to yourself, best ask people who were under British occupation and colonization about it …
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truth and peace and love,
C

Silvio-vs-Pablo

September 9, 2011

Silvio et al,
no hay prosa, ni poesía que justifique ni pueda (ni malamente) teorizar con alguna latitud técnica ni moral, que unos gobernantes se mantengan en el poder -en definitiva a la fuerza- y sean los tácitos dueños de un país entero y añado para aquellos (al parecer muchos) que ni alcanzan imaginarse eso; les aclaro que los Castros/el gobierno dictatorial actual en Cuba, son los dueños empresariales (de todos los centros de trabajos), de los medias (todos (¿4?) los periódicos, la radio, …), de todo el territorio juridiccional del país entero, sus recursos, determinan quién sale y entra al país, … (no, eso no vuelve a la gente de un país clínicamente loca, ni la “libertad” los salva de locuras y tamañas p3nd3j@d@s en nombre de “Dios”, la “democracia”, … (como he notado con los yumas))

Yo, lo confieso, hace buen rato que me he curado de todo tipo de p3nd3j@d@s trascendentales. En definitiva lo que importa es la gente. No creo ya ni en pioneros “por el comunismo” ni “por el capitalismo” tampoco. Un amigo me decía tan certera como jocosamente que al estilo beisbolero “en tres y dos”, que hay tres cualidades de las cuales los cubanos podemos tener sólo dos y ellas son: ser “revolucionarios” (oficialistas), ser inteligentes, y/o ser sinceros. Yo, como que muy naturalmente suelo categorizar a aquellos que opinan con respecto a Cuba entre dos bandos: los “con la revolución todo” y los “sin la revolución nada”. Tu, por ejemplo, perteneces al primer grupo y Montaner al segundo. Digo “categorizar” por falta de una mejor palabra, en realidad noto que unos y otros bailan al compás de la música de sus respectivas versiones de la(s) verdad(es); como que ambos grupos hablan idiomas/desde (referencias a) realidades no sólo bien diferentes, sino que olvidan, mientras disfrutan sus respectivas músicas/bailares, que en definitiva esa es, más que cualquier otra cosa, su opinión muy particular. Por momentos tengo dudas sobre hasta que punto son selectivos o sencillamente no “agarran/pueden agarrar” la volá. Se han hecho experimentos bien graciosos (que ni siquiera tienen que ver con asuntos políticos) en los que se ha demostrado que el ser humano ni piensa, ni percibe, sino que todo lo que mentalmente procesa es para guiarse a traves de/usarlo para “demostrar” sus ideas preconcebidas. Encuentro también asombrosa la rapidez y diligencia con que algunos de nuestros paisanos cambian de “palo” pa` “rumba” casi en el mismo compás.

Te digo algo, nuestros (culturalmente hablando) paisanos adinerad(it)os de Miami -genuinamente- se molestan y forman las algarabías solariegas esas que nos caracterizan (de bloqueaderas del highway y todo (que sacan de onda totalmente a los yumas con toda su “coolness”)) cuando ellos se ponen a joder a los balseros. Me gusta de nos que no somos cínicos, somos bien parejeros, (en general) no somos trascendentales. Cuando yo estuve en Guantánamo preso, muchos de ellos fueron a visitarnos y yo me preguntaba por qué esa gente decían que eran cubanos, si es que ni siquieran habían comido malanga en toda su vida @@ (es tan raro como que una persona (de nuestras generaciones) diga ser yuma y no saber quién es Frank Sinatra), de hecho el único modo de notar que son (al menos en algo) cubanos es porque cuando hablan Inglés de pronto soltaban bien clarito sus “comemierda” ;-) (aunque pudiesen haber dicho “@ssh0l3”). De esa gente los más reaccionarios son los que más escándalo forman pero lo que le da sentido a sus estupideces es que en realidad hay una dictadura que se mantiene en Cuba y que al parecer tu le encuentras alguna validez/legitimidad. Y, sí, en su gran mayoría son una récua de imbéciles y “perdedores” (¡algunos parecen haber estado por más de medio sigle de sufridores y/o al parecer no hallan nada que hacer! ¡Que imbecilidad esa de copiar discos (lo que además es ilegal) y pasarles una aplanadora por arriba!), bien atípicos y yo diría hasta tristemente risibles y contraproducentes, pero ¿por qué (al parecer tu, Pablo, …) le dan tanta importancia a esa gente? Cuba ni es Miami ni nunca lo será y los cubanos son en definita los que viven en la isla. La “democracia”/el capitalismo no tiene que ser estilo yuma, de hecho para mí las mejores logradas formas de socialismo son las de los fineses, belgas, holandeses (tiempo cordura medio-europea)

No hay nada, ni nadie “über Alles”, ni esa gente en Miami, ni su contraparte “todo con la revolución” en Cuba y estoy de acuerdo contigo cuando hablas a modo de critiar a Pablo de un “testimonio cotidiano de un hombre que, más por intuición que por sabiduría, nunca se ha creído infalible”. Pero, ¿por qué es que aunque no te das a ti mismo este beneficio y criticas a Pablo; sí se lo sigues concediendo a la dictadura que aún (des)gobierna Cuba y que al parecer se creen los único capaces de determinar/participar políticamente? Los polacos, rusos, sudafricanos, argentinos, chilenos, … se han safado de sus dictaduras y han arreglado/redefinido sus relajos. Los Sandinistas decorosamente lo entendieron en su momento, en Latinoamérica (casi en pleno con la excepción inminente de Guatemala) no sólo se han safado de sus dictaduras y ha habido un proceso de concientización general de “las masas” en nuestros países, sino (while they were at it) ¡han mandado al “Washington agenda” al carajo! (¡¡¡que rico que después de los dos términos presidenciales de Lula los brasileros eligieron a Dilma Rousseff!!!)

Si, al igual que a tí me molesta (inclusive desde varios puntos de vista) que los yumas le mantengan un embargo a Cuba, como bien dijo Kofi Annan los yumas están moralmente en bancarota. ¿Qué carajos les interesa a los yumas Cuba, Tamayo, los “derechos humanos”, …? (Y no hay animosidad en mi, lo pregunto muy latamente y “vivo en el monstruo”) ¿Por qué le dan tanta relevancia al capítulo cubano de “las damas de blanco”, cuando en el caso de las originales en Argentina ellos entrenaron, sufragaron y participaron directamente en las torturas (inclusive utilizando perros para abusar de ellas sexualmente)/les asesinaron/”desaparicieron” a sus familiares (a algunas inclusive las asesinaron después de esperar que dieran a luz para robarles sus recién nacidos)? ¿Dónde estaba la solidaridad de los “líderes de la democracia”? ¿Cómo es posible que le otorgen medallas por reportera (a sueldo ;-)) de la “verdad” a Yoani Sánchez (nada orillera/bien ovaruda ella, aunque la utilicen/sea super selectiva sobre lo que habla y (según creo aparentemente) naive/ingenua sobre lo que hace (y muchas veces ni logro entiender de qué carajos habla)) cuando mantienen preso a Bradley Manning (bradleymanning.org) por exponer la verdad sobre los abusos y el genocidio de los yumas que más que ha doblado el de los nazis? ¿Si es ellos defienden tanto a “la libertad”, cómo es posible que le teman despavoridamente a la verdad (al punto de exhortar pública y desfachatadamente desde su mismísimo gobierno porque asesinen a Julian Assange)?

penultimosdias.com/2011/05/30/quien-le-teme-a-wikileaks-i/ (Camilo López)

Tu dices (aunque desde un punto de vista poéticamente “cómodo” (Casiopea)) que “hoy sobrevivo apenas a mi suerte … el mundo propio siempre es el mejor” (youtube.com/watch?v=4ltn5waBptY). Yo, te digo, soy y sigo siendo un poco de todo lo que he (sobre)vivido (mi madre, mi niñez/adolescencia en Cuba, estudiar en Alemania, …, vivir en el yuma). Como dices en una estrofa de una de mis líricas favoritas, inclusive “he planteado con un verso una verdad”

https://hsymbolicus.wordpress.com/category/poems/ (lies …)

Yo pertenezco a la generación perdida, de los tantos que decidimos o no tuvimos otra opción que marcharnos. No se trata de un improvisado descargando sus jodederas somáticas contigo. Para serte más claro/darte una referencia más cercana, soy Camilo (hermano de Oriente/Afrocuba). Yo defendí lo que creí en su momento era cierto/justo y no le hice el juego a la mentira/los abusos de la policía/el gobierno ni en Cuba, ni lo hago ahora que vivo en “la libertad”/el yuma, además de que nunca he recibido un centavo de ninguno de los bandos y me ha salido de hecho bien caro:

http://ipsoscustodes.wordpress.com/2010/10/16/quis-custodiet-ipsos-custodes/

Creo que es inevitable un violento bandazo a la derecha/”pro yuma” en Cuba, pero ¿a qué le temes? Tu poesía esta llena de esperanza e incitación a la condición humana. Habrá, sin duda un espacio para la muy vital necedad; para seguir uno defendiendo sus verdades/luchando en contra de las mentiras/los abusos.

Saludos
C

java.util.Hashtable inconcistencies . . .

November 27, 2010

~
I run today into, what seem to me to be, some inconcistencies using java.util.Hashtable, which would not effectively look into the actual values of the String[] in order to search for and identify the same keys.
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I had previously used java.util.Hashtable heavily, so, unless I am missing something fundamental, I find this behavior really odd.
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I carefully read the java Hashtable API which is part of the jdk since 1.0
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http://download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Hashtable.html
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and it does not say anything about arrays or multidimensional objects. Yet is says:
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“Every key and every value is an object. In any one Dictionary object, every key is associated with at most one value”.
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and
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“As a rule, the equals method should be used by implementations of this class to decide if two keys are the same”.
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but then
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http://download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#equals%28java.lang.Object%29
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uses Object.hashCode()s which apparently only in the case of multidimensional arrays are the same as the System.identityHashCode
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This is not clearly specified in the API, but to me this is an obvious inconsistency.
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Why is that? Why is it String objects actual values are being compared but not those values belonging to String[]s?
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How can you tweak java.util.Hashtables so that they actually use as keys the String[] sequences?
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I am using:
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$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_16"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_16-b01)
Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 14.2-b01, mixed mode, sharing)

~
based on:
~

$ uname -a
Linux Microknoppix 2.6.31.6 #4 SMP PREEMPT Tue Nov 10 19:11:11 CET 2009 i686 GNU/Linux

~
Here is the test code
~

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;

public class HTblSARI00Test{
// __
public static void main(String[] args){
Integer Itgr;
boolean Is;
int iSysIDHKd, iHshKd;

System.out.println(" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ");
System.out.println("~");
// __ put(ting) aTestSAr (a one dimensional java.lang.String[] array)

Hashtable HTblSARI = new Hashtable();
String[] aTestSAr = new String[]{"abc", "123", "xyz"};
String[] aTestSAr2;

System.out.println("// __ aTestSAr (new String[]{\"abc\", \"123\", \"xyz\"})");

System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.size(): " + HTblSARI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.put(aTestSAr, HTblSARI.size())");
HTblSARI.put(aTestSAr, HTblSARI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.size(): " + HTblSARI.size());
iHshKd = aTestSAr.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ aTestSAr.hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestSAr);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode(aTestSAr): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestSAr.equals(aTestSAr);
System.out.println("// __ aTestSAr.equals(aTestSAr): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.get(aTestS): " + Itgr);
System.out.println("~");

aTestSAr2 = new String[]{"abc", "123", "xyz"};
System.out.println("// __ aTestSAr2 (new String[]{\"abc\", \"123\", \"xyz\"})");
iHshKd = aTestSAr2.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ aTestSAr2.hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestSAr2);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode(aTestSAr2): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestSAr.equals(aTestSAr2);
System.out.println("// __ aTestSAr.equals(aTestSAr2): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr2);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr2): " + Itgr);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.put(aTestSAr2, HTblSARI.size())");
HTblSARI.put(aTestSAr2, HTblSARI.size());
Itgr = HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr2);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr2): " + Itgr);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSARI.size(): " + HTblSARI.size());
System.out.println("~");

System.out.println(" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ");
System.out.println("~");

// __ Trying the same thing with a java.lang.String
Hashtable HTblSI = new Hashtable();
String aTestS = "abc";
String aTestS2;
System.out.println("// __ aTestS (\"abc\"): " + aTestS);

System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());

System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.put(aTestS, HTblSI.size())");
HTblSI.put(aTestS, HTblSI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());

iHshKd = aTestS.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ aTestS.hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestS);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode(aTestS): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestS.equals(aTestS);
System.out.println("// __ aTestS.equals(aTestS): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSI.get(aTestS);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.get(aTestS): " + Itgr);
if(Itgr == null){
HTblSI.put(aTestS, HTblSI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());
}
System.out.println("~");

aTestS2 = "abc";
System.out.println("// __ aTestS2 (\"abc\"): " + aTestS2);
iHshKd = aTestS2.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ \"abc\".hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode(\"abc\"): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestS.equals(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ aTestS.equals(\"abc\"): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSI.get(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.get(\"abc\"): " + Itgr);
if(Itgr == null){
HTblSI.put(aTestS2, HTblSI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());
}
System.out.println("~");

aTestS2 = (new String("abc".getBytes()));
System.out.println("// __ aTestS2 (new String(\"abc\".getBytes())): " + aTestS2);
iHshKd = aTestS2.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ (new String(\"abc\".getBytes())).hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode((new String(\"abc\".getBytes()))): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestS.equals(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ aTestS.equals((new String(\"abc\".getBytes()))): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSI.get(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.get((new String(\"abc\".getBytes())): " + Itgr);
if(Itgr == null){
HTblSI.put(aTestS2, HTblSI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());
}
System.out.println("~");

aTestS2 = (new String("abc"));
System.out.println("// __ aTestS2 (new String(\"abc\")): " + aTestS2);
iHshKd = aTestS2.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ (new String(\"abc\")).hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode((new String(\"abc\"))): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestS.equals(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ aTestS.equals((new String(\"abc\")))): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSI.get(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.get((new String(\"abc\")): " + Itgr);
if(Itgr == null){
HTblSI.put(aTestS2, HTblSI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());
}
System.out.println("~");

aTestS2 = (new StringBuffer("abc").toString());
System.out.println("// __ aTestS2 (new StringBuffer(\"abc\").toString()): " + aTestS2);
iHshKd = aTestS2.hashCode();
System.out.println("// __ (new StringBuffer(\"abc\").toString()).hashCode(): " + iHshKd);
iSysIDHKd = System.identityHashCode(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ System.identityHashCode((new StringBuffer(\"abc\").toString())): " + iSysIDHKd);
Is = aTestS.equals(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ aTestS.equals(new StringBuffer(\"abc\").toString()): " + Is);
Itgr = HTblSI.get(aTestS2);
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.get((new StringBuffer(\"abc\").toString())): " + Itgr);
if(Itgr == null){
HTblSI.put(aTestS2, HTblSI.size());
System.out.println("// __ HTblSI.size(): " + HTblSI.size());
}
System.out.println("~");

System.out.println(" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ");
}
}

~
and the result
~

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~
// __ aTestSAr (new String[]{"abc", "123", "xyz"})
// __ HTblSARI.size(): 0
// __ HTblSARI.put(aTestSAr, HTblSARI.size())
// __ HTblSARI.size(): 1
// __ aTestSAr.hashCode(): 4072869
// __ System.identityHashCode(aTestSAr): 4072869
// __ aTestSAr.equals(aTestSAr): true
// __ HTblSARI.get(aTestS): 0
~
// __ aTestSAr2 (new String[]{"abc", "123", "xyz"})
// __ aTestSAr2.hashCode(): 1671711
// __ System.identityHashCode(aTestSAr2): 1671711
// __ aTestSAr.equals(aTestSAr2): false
// __ HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr2): null
// __ HTblSARI.put(aTestSAr2, HTblSARI.size())
// __ HTblSARI.get(aTestSAr2): 1
// __ HTblSARI.size(): 2
~
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~
// __ aTestS ("abc"): abc
// __ HTblSI.size(): 0
// __ HTblSI.put(aTestS, HTblSI.size())
// __ HTblSI.size(): 1
// __ aTestS.hashCode(): 96354
// __ System.identityHashCode(aTestS): 11394033
// __ aTestS.equals(aTestS): true
// __ HTblSI.get(aTestS): 0
~
// __ aTestS2 ("abc"): abc
// __ "abc".hashCode(): 96354
// __ System.identityHashCode("abc"): 11394033
// __ aTestS.equals("abc"): true
// __ HTblSI.get("abc"): 0
~
// __ aTestS2 (new String("abc".getBytes())): abc
// __ (new String("abc".getBytes())).hashCode(): 96354
// __ System.identityHashCode((new String("abc".getBytes()))): 4384790
// __ aTestS.equals((new String("abc".getBytes()))): true
// __ HTblSI.get((new String("abc".getBytes())): 0
~
// __ aTestS2 (new String("abc")): abc
// __ (new String("abc")).hashCode(): 96354
// __ System.identityHashCode((new String("abc"))): 9634993
// __ aTestS.equals((new String("abc")))): true
// __ HTblSI.get((new String("abc")): 0
~
// __ aTestS2 (new StringBuffer("abc").toString()): abc
// __ (new StringBuffer("abc").toString()).hashCode(): 96354
// __ System.identityHashCode((new StringBuffer("abc").toString())): 1641745
// __ aTestS.equals(new StringBuffer("abc").toString()): true
// __ HTblSI.get((new StringBuffer("abc").toString())): 0
~
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

~
Thank you
hsymbolicus